Hepatitis A outbreak at New Jersey golf club leaves 1 dead, 27 others sickened

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At least one person who contracted hepatitis A linked to an outbreak at a golf and tennis club in New Jersey has died, local officials said.

At least 27 others have been sickened due to the outbreak connected to the Mendham Golf & Tennis Club, officials with the Morris County Office of Health Management said, according to NJ.com. That’s an increase from the 23 who were sickened earlier this month when news of the outbreak first broke.

The person who died was not identified.

HEPATITIS A OUTBREAK AT NEW JERSEY GOLF CLUB AFFECTS NEARLY TWO DOZEN PEOPLE, ONE INDIVIDUAL ‘SERIOUSLY ILL’

An infected food handler was likely behind the outbreak, the New Jersey Department of Health previously said. Those sickened were exposed between June 9 and June 30 but were not notified of a possible exposure until July 5.

The outbreak was contained to the members-only club.

When members were first notified, they were asked to inform any guests who may have dined at the club with them.

“This notification also advised that those who dined at the club when the food-handler was potentially infectious should receive post-exposure prophylaxis,” health officials said at the time.

The “highly contagious” liver infection is caused by the hepatitis A virus, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The virus typically spreads when a person eats or drinks something “contaminated by small, undetected amounts of stool from an infected person,” the health agency said.

Those who contract hepatitis A — not to be confused with hepatitis B or C, which are caused by different viruses — may be sick for “several weeks” and usually fully recover, according to the CDC. It is rare to die from the illness, though hepatitis A can cause liver failure and death, typically in those who are 50 years of age or older.

Symptoms include fever, fatigue, dark urine, vomiting, joint pain, and jaundice, among other signs.

‘MULTIPLE’ MINNESOTA COUNTIES AFFECTED BY HEP A OUTBREAK; OFFICIALS SAY DRUG USERS, HOMELESS HIT HARDEST

While hepatitis A infections do happen in the U.S., they’re more common in developing countries where sanitation and hygiene are poor, the CDC says.

The disease is preventable with a vaccine.

A spokesperson for the Morris County Office of Health Management did not immediately return Fox News’ request for comment.



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