A Looping Failure – Diabetes Daily

0
12


This content originally appeared on Test Guess and Go. Republished with permission.

A few days ago, I unscrewed the top of my RileyLink case, removed the tiny circuit board, and disconnected the battery. I put the box of pods back in the closet and retrieved my Tandem pump from the medical supply clutter box.

I am officially declaring my looping experiment to be over.

If you don’t know what looping is, it is a user-created app for an automated insulin delivery system that pairs an Omnipod or old Medtronic pump, a continuous glucose monitor (CGM), and a computer algorithm. If you want to learn more, read Loop Docs and check out the Looped Facebook group. Earlier this summer with files made available by the rockstars of the Do-It-Yourself community, I used my Mac laptop and a newly-acquired Apple Developer Account to create the loop app on my iPhone. It was a miraculous experience for an experienced person with diabetes and a relatively inexperienced techie.

But I hated the pods. They often hurt and my insulin absorption was erratic. The occasional dark red/purple bruises were quite horrible and proof that diabetes can be a blood and gore sport. Some days the pods worked great. Other days I would bolus and bolus (or loop would basal and basal) with seemingly no effect on my blood sugar.

Previous to the opportunity to try looping with an Omnipod, I was never interested in pods. I was convinced that they would be more awkward on my body than a tubed pump and infusion set. This feeling is why it is important to have a choice for those of us with diabetes. As much as I hate pods, there are people who despise tubes and love podding. I started using pods a few weeks before starting to loop and quickly discovered that even changing pods every two days didn’t give consistent results. But I was excited at the possibility of automated insulin delivery and persevered.

In order to have success looping, your pump settings must be close to perfect. Basal rates, bolus ratios, and insulin sensitivity factors are hugely important. My experience was that settings which worked well one day were abysmally wrong the next day. Because of my variable results with pods, I was pessimistic that I could get settings that would work consistently.

But it would be unfair to blame all of my looping problems on pods. I was an emotional looper and incredibly impatient when things didn’t go well. Instead of methodically problem-solving, I either randomly changed pump settings or in frustration went back to my Tandem pump for a couple of days. I was not good at relinquishing control over my insulin delivery and couldn’t move past 42 years of being the brain for my diabetes.

All along, I have known that my future is with Tandem. In the last year, I have been frustrated at my inability to use Basal IQ because of Dexcom’s delay in providing seniors with the Dexcom G6. But it will come and I am cautiously excited about the Tandem Control IQ hybrid-closed loop that will be available late this year or early next. I thought looping would be a good experiment for the months while I continue to wait for G6.

Longterm using an Omnipod is incredibly expensive under Medicare in comparison to a tubed pump. My Tandem pump, its supplies, and insulin are covered under Part B where Basic Medicare pays 80% of the cost and my Supplemental plan pays the remaining 20%. Thus I have no out-of-pocket cost. Omnipod is covered under Medicare Part D pharmacy benefits. With my Cigna plan, the pods were Tier 3 with a $405 annual deductible and then hefty copays. Plus my insulin was provided under Tier 3 pharmacy benefits with copays and donut-hole repercussions. 

One reason that it was easy for me to abandon loop is that prior to looping, my diabetes numbers were mostly “in range.” Interestingly I compared 2-week Dexcom Clarity reports between looping and my Tandem pump and the statistics were virtually identical. My hope with looping was to reduce the mental burden of diabetes and it never really happened. I had some wonderful overnights where loop prevented lows and highs and I woke up at a steady blood glucose (BG) of 93. But I had just as many nights with constant Dexcom low and high alarms. In general, I wasn’t one of the experienced and ecstatic loopers who saw meaningful improvements in their diabetes life. And remember I was too impatient to keep working at it.

Will I try looping again? Maybe, maybe not. There were things I loved about looping: being in charge of my settings, targets, and alerts, controlling my diabetes from my iPhone and Apple Watch, and the potential to free up brain width that never rests with diabetes. The looping community is incredible with help, expertise, and support given to all-comers (except the grouchy ones). Automated insulin delivery is the future but we are still limited by hardware, the speed of insulin, and the infinite complexity of type 1 diabetes.

Today I am very comfortable with my decision to abandon looping. I am relieved to be back using a tubed pump with less pain and somewhat more predictable results. There are definite warts using my Tandem pump with occasional occlusion alarms and non-customizable annoying alerts. But I am comfortable being back to “what I know.” I learned a lot while looping and for sure gained more appreciation of how incredibly difficult it is to manage diabetes. I was once again reminded that while improvement is possible, perfection is not.

If you are interested in looping, I encourage you to check it out. My experience was only my experience and not an indication of how the system will work for you. Lots of people are having great success with this do-it-yourself app and I am grateful for having had the opportunity to loop and then the opportunity not to loop.

Post Views: 132

Read more about , , , , , , , , , , , .



Source link