How The Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) Can Help Your Family

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How The Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) Can Help Your Family

How The Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) Can Help Your Family

Table Of Contents:

  • How does SNAP work?
  • How can I find out if I’m eligible for SNAP?
  • What resources can I have that still make me eligible for SNAP?

The financial burden created from a cancer diagnosis can unfortunately affect many areas of one’s life, including having your basic needs met. When medical bills start piling up, you may be struggling to make ends meet.

Did you know there is a federal program that can assist you with buying food for you and your family?

The Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) is the largest federal nutrition assistance program that provides benefits to eligible low-income individuals and families.

How does SNAP work?

Once approved, you will be sent an Electronic Benefits Transfer card, similar to a debit card, which can be used to buy food in certain grocery stores, as long as it’s on their eligible food list.

How can I find out if I’m eligible?

To apply for the SNAP program, you must apply through your state agency. You can find the state directory here

Eligibility for U.S. citizens is determined based on household income and resources. In reference to the income chart below, you must meet both the gross and net income limits. Some exceptions are made on a case-by-case basis. If you have an elderly person in your household, different restrictions apply.

How The Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) Can Help Your Family

For non-citizens, your eligibility is determined by if you meet one of the following:

  • Have lived in the United States for at least 5 years.
  • Be receiving disability-related assistance or benefits.
  • Be children under 18.

What resources can I have that still make me eligible?

Households may have $2,250 in countable resources, meaning cash or this amount in your bank account, or $3,500 in countable resources if at least one member of the household is age 60 or older, or is disabled. These amounts are updated annually.

The following resources will not be counted when determining your eligibility:

  • A home and/or lot
  • Resources of people who receive Supplemental Security Income (SSI)
  • Resources of people who receive Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF, also known as welfare)
  • Most retirement and pension plans (withdrawals from these accounts may count as either income or resources depending on how often they occur).

Contact your state agency now to apply for SNAP.

Looking for more state resources? Triage Cancer’s Chart of State Laws can help! We also have many financial resources you’ll find useful too.

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