Rethinking My Stance on Bomb Shelters

Recently, I’ve been involved in several discussions regarding possible future threats we might face and which emergency preparedness measures might be prudent in order to more easily ensure survival of those events. Through the course of those talks, I began to see a few things in a different light from what I had previously, and I am close to changing my mind on the subject of bomb shelters.

Whether you call them that, or if you prefer the term bunker or fallout shelter or whatever doesn’t much matter; the general idea is the same. I have never been a proponent of taking the time and resources to build one with the noted exception of individuals living close to large population centers that might one day be targeted by a terrorist attack with a so called suitcase nuke or dirty bomb.

In truth, I still have a hard time imagining a scenario where we end up in an all-out nuclear exchange of the type envisioned during the Cold War, although recent news regarding both China and North Korea do give me pause as far as the future is concerned. In today’s geopolitical climate, I still maintain the most prevalent threat of attack via WMDs would be isolated to areas near large cities and/or valuable military or infrastructure assets and originate from a terrorist source.

But, who is to say what could happen? Even if you consider the idea that we might be attacked unlikely, would you really want to gamble your life and those of your loved ones on that? And, what about the strange weather we’ve been experiencing? Whether you believe in global warming or not, one cannot deny that something is happening. There were two separate tornado scares in the dense central Appalachian mountains of southern West Virginia where I live this past winter, and I can tell you as someone who has lived here my entire life that is exceedingly rare. In fact, in one of those instances, it was reported to me that an eyewitness saw a funnel cloud come down and rip the roof off of a building. The news called it a “collapse due to high winds.”

You can believe whatever you wish, but I will be undertaking the task of drawing up plans for a shelter at my homestead. Even if I never need it for protection (and that is hard to believe as I am still a relatively young man), it will still benefit me as a secure space to store my preps. I’ll share the layout of my plans in another article later.



Source by Jeremy Crews

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